TerraPower

Gregory P. Landis

General Counsel

Gregory Landis is the Senior Vice President and General Counsel for TerraPower, in charge of legal, regulatory and government affairs. In addition, he has interim responsibility for Human Resources and Corporate Communications.

He spent 17 years with McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enersen in San Francisco, CA working in commercial litigation with a concentration in antitrust, securities litigation, telecommunications and regulatory work. His clients included Pacific Gas & Electric, AT&T, KPMG Peat Marwick, Deloitte & Touche, Amfac and Embassy Suites. In 1995, Landis became General Counsel and later Executive Vice President for AT&T Wireless Services, Inc. During his time there, he supervised the negotiations with AT&T leading to the split-off of AWS as an independent company in July 2001 and had a leading role in the $42B sale of the company to Cingular in 2004.

From 2005 to 2007, Landis served as the General Counsel for Vulcan, Inc., where he led the Legal Department in support of Paul Allen’s investment, R&D, sports and philanthropic activities. In 2007, he became General Counsel for Intellectual Ventures, with responsibility for legal and government affairs, including intellectual property protection and transactions, corporate governance, legal and regulatory compliance, government affairs, fund formation, financings, employment law and patent and general litigation.

Beginning in June 2011, Landis provided legal and strategic advice as a consultant for Intellectual Ventures and later for TerraPower. Landis serves on the Board of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law and is co-chair of the Strategic Planning Committee. Previously he chaired the Board of Equal Justice Works, served on the Board of Seattle Children’s Theater and co-founded the Northwest General Counsel Association.

Landis graduated with a B.A. in Psychology from Yale University in 1973 and earned a J.D., from Harvard Law School in 1978. He is the co-author of Selecting the Next Nominee for the Federal Circuit: Patently Obvious to Consider Diversity (2010).